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In Memoriam

Tuesday, September 11, 2001, New York City, New York

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

Book of Lamentations

For the Lord will not cast off forever: but though He cause grief, yet will He have compassion according to the multitude of His mercies, For He doth not afflict willingly nor grieve the children of men.

 

September 11, 2005 - A Memorial

The September 11 Digital Archives

 

 

 

 

 

 

 " I hurry to express to you and your fellow citizens my profound sorrow and my closeness in prayer for the nation at this dark and tragic moment."

-- Pope John Paul II, in a telegram sent to President George W. Bush

 

 

"We have been reminded very powerfully of the existence of evil in our world and of the power that evil can seem to have... We are praying from our hearts for those who have been killed and injured and for the heroic people who are involved in the rescue efforts. May God bless us with courage and strength"

 -- Bishop George J. Lucas, of the Catholic Diocese of Springfield, Illinois

 

 

Pope John Paul II said massive terror attacks in the United States marked "a dark day in the history of humanity" and asked pilgrims during a sombre general audience to join him in prayer.

Dropping ordinary audience procedure, the pope devoted his entire text Sept 12 to the attacks less than 24 hours earlier, in which hijacked planes destroyed New York's World Trade Center towers and damaged the Pentagon. Initial casualty estimates suggested that thousands of people were killed.

"The human heart has depths from which schemes of unheard-of ferocity sometimes emerge, capable of destroying in a moment the normal daily life of a people," the pope told 25,000 pilgrims who hung on his words in an eerily quiet St Peter's Square. "But faith comes to our aid when words seem to fail," he said. "Even if the forces of darkness appear to prevail, those who believe in God know that evil and death do not have the final say."

The pope said he had offered his morning Mass for "the helpless victims of this tragedy." He assured his spiritual closeness to the "beloved people of the United States in this moment of distress and consternation, when the courage of so many men and women of good will is being sorely tested." Though he usually addresses pilgrims in at least a dozen languages, the pope spoke  only in Italian and English.   His comments were summarised by aides in French, German, Spanish, Portuguese and Polish.

At the end of the audience, the pope led prayers for the disaster's victims and for the ultimate victory of reconciliation and peace. "Let us beg the Lord that the spiral of hatred and violence will not prevail," he said. A papal aide read a prayer petition in English, asking God to help Americans who are suffering "not to let themselves be overwhelmed by sorrow, despair and a spirit  of vengeance" but instead to "commit themselves to building a better world" in the confidencethat ood will triumph over evil.

-- Catholic News, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad

 

 

 

 

 

Archbishop Edward J Gilbert sent the following letter of condolence dated September 11, to David Stewart, Charge d'Affaires at the United States Embassy:

Dear Mr Stewart,

I am writing to express the profound sadness and sincere condolences of the people of the Archdiocese of Port of Spain for the people of the United States due to the terrorist attack on New York and Washington earlier today. It was truly horrific to watch the television reports. I assure you the Archdiocese will pray for the people and government of the United States of America especially for all those who were killed and their families.

With deep regret, I am

Sincerely yours,

+ Most Reverend Edward J Gilbert CSsR

    Archbishop of Port of Spain, Trinidad, West Indies

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


".....As we hear the calls for tightened American security and a fierce military response to terrorism, it is obvious that none of us has any answers. However, we feel compelled to ask some questions. Everything has a cause, so we have to ask, What was the root cause of this evil? We must find out not superficially but at the deepest level. There is no doubt that such evil is alive all around the world and is even celebrated. Does this evil grow from the suffering and anguish felt by people we don't know and therefore ignore? Have they lived in this condition for a long time? One assumes that whoever did this attack feels implacable hatred for America. Why were we selected to be the focus of suffering around the world? "

"....When we have secured our safety once more and cared for the wounded, after the period of shock and mourning is over, it will be time for soul searching. I only hope that these questions are confronted with the deepest spiritual intent. None of us will feel safe again behind the shield of military might and stockpiled arsenals. There can be no safety until the root cause is faced. "    

--Deepak Chopra, M.D.

 


Muslim group condemns US attacks

The Ahmadiyya Muslim community of Trinidad and Tobago has condemned the "barbaric and cowardly act of terrorism" against innocent civilians on September 11 in the United States. Thousands were killed when two planes crashed into the World Trade Center in New York City and one into the Pentagon in Washington DC. The Ahmadiyya group said it was "deeply saddened by the loss of innocent lives". The community described the attacks as a "brutal and terrible act against humanity" and extended its condolences to "those who have either lost family or friends, or are hurt physically or emotionally".

-- Trinidad Guardian On-Line, September 24, 2001

 

 

 

 

 


Cuba proclaims that it is opposed to terrorism and opposed to war -

Speech by President Fidel Castro Ruz, President of the Republic of Cuba, Havana, September 22, 2001




 

 

 

 

 

 



The Dalai Lama warned, however, that "bombing can eliminate only physical things, not thoughts or emotions. Talk and reasoning is the only long-term solution." October 24, 2001

The Dalai Lama justifies the US attacks on Afghanistan, but advocates a non-violent method to prevent  terrorism. -     November 9, 2001